Analysis Of Deborah Fink 's ' The Rural Midwest '

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“Cutting Into the Meatpacking Line: Workers and Change in the Rural Midwest” book, by Deborah Fink, focuses mainly on showing what was happening in the meatpacking’s industry in the rural Midwest of Iowa. It shows that the key factors in the creation the history of the rural working class depended on the different experiences that gender, ethnic and racial minorities faced during the working years in the meatpacking. It shows the painful process of struggling for recognition of the employees ' rights that women, ethnic and racial minorities faced when they were entering into the meatpacking workforce. Fink wrote her book to inform the reader about what was happening in the meatpacking industry of Iowa the old days, and how women, ethnic and racial minorities faced a lot of segregation, discrimination, harassment, and unequal wages. What does Fink mean when she once said “The union, in digging in its heels to preserve the old system, conceded gender to the manipulation of packing companies, thereby contributing to the deterioration of conditions for all workers (Fink, P. 112)”? What was the old system look alike? Moreover, what was the impact of the manipulation of gender? The old system was supporting the gender division in the workplace. This division had generated workplace’s conflict and inequality between different gender in the workplace of Iowa. Started by rural working class women before 1940 when the society thought that women 's works were indecent. Even though,

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