Attending College Is A Major Accomplishment For Many Students.

990 WordsJan 28, 20174 Pages
Attending college is a major accomplishment for many students. Students come from various backgrounds which include first generation attendees and minorities. Unfortunately, many students who begin fail to matriculate to their second year at a higher learning institute. Student retention is a long standing issue with no clear cut solution. Many researchers have conducted studies to try and understand the lack of attendance after the student’s first year. Retention and Academic Restructuring Vincent Tinto (1999) has found that many colleges speak on the importance of increasing student retention and invest in programs or resources to assist with better outcomes. Some institutions hire consultants while others have embraced an array…show more content…
Third, students are more likely to continue at an institution that value them as members. Constant contact with students, faculty, and staff also encourages academic persistence. Finally, learning is the most important factor that contributes to student retention with students who stay being the students that learn (Tinto, 1999). Active involvement in the student experience seems to be key to student retention. Undergraduates that stay on task and are active in learning activities are more likely to return (Tinto, 1999). Sadly, majority of first-year students experience their first year of education as an isolated experience with students taking courses as detached units (Tinto, 1999). Although study programs are designed specifically for each major, social and academic unity is lacking (Tinto, 1999). The first year of college should be restructured with various factors in mind. To begin, students should learn in a joint surrounding and should be the norm (Tinto, 1999). Disconnect can occur when students matriculate alone . Secondly, academic advising should be a crucial part of a student’s first year. It should reflect the best professional expertise (Tinto, 1999). Third, important concepts within the freshman seminar should be integrated the first year and should connect learning practices that occur frequently (Tinto, 1999). Fourth, the first year of college should be accepted as a
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