Christianity And The Greco Roman Religion

864 Words4 Pages
During the period of the New Testament, two religions, Judaism and the Greco-Roman religion, were prevalent in the Mediterranean. The Greco-Roman religion, spread through Hellenization, held the Gentiles of the Roman Empire in cultural unity, while Judaism served as the cultural basis for the Jewish community. Both religions signified the cultural identity of a community in the Mediterranean and remained as separate entities due to ideological and ethnical differences. Separation, however, did not mean these religions were polar opposites in nature. Judaism, although different from the Greco-Roman religion which was prevalent in the world, can be evaluated as a Greco-Roman religion which diverged.
In order to view Judaism as a different variant of the Greco-Roman religion, the Greco-Roman religion needs to be understood. Having had roots with Greek Mythology and Roman influence, the Greco-Roman religion was in fact many religions spread across the empire instead of one large religion. Yet, the religions can be grouped into one category as they all shared five key characteristics. First, the Greco-Roman religion was polytheistic. As was understood by the followers of the religion, multiple divine beings were in existence who deserved worship. These divine beings were ranked in a hierarchy of power with tiers consisting of the one god, the great gods, the local gods, divine beings, and humans. Second, the religion was cultic in nature. A sacred doctrine of worship and
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