Cognitive Behavioral Therapy ( Cbt )

937 WordsJun 28, 20164 Pages
First and foremost, what is cognitive behavioral therapy? The Mayo Clinic website defines cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as a common type of psychotherapy, talk therapy, wherein the individual seeking therapy works with a mental health counselor in a structured way for a prescribed set of meeting. (web citation) CBT is a goal oriented therapeutic approach which allows the individual in therapy to identify troubling situations or conditions in their life; allows the individual to become aware of their thoughts, emotions, and beliefs about these problems; teaches the individual to identify negative or inaccurate thinking; then finally enables the individual to reshape negative and inaccurate thinking. According to the website for The Center for Health and Healing, CBT arose in the 1950-60s and was a result of the outgrowth of behavioral and cognitive therapeutic approaches. This time frame in American history also saw the de-institutionalization of the mentally ill from state funded hospitals and re-integrated of this population into the surrounding communities with little to no support for their individual mental illness. Aaron T. Beck and Albert Ellis, both former psychoanalysts, emerged as two pioneers in this field and developed their theories of cognitive and rational emotive therapy. CBT is supported by additional studies as effective form of therapy. The process of CBT involves the therapist and patient setting goals together while the patient’s progress is
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