Cultural Values Of The Ojibwa Culture

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The Ojibwa or known as the Chippewa in European are people of northeastern North America. The term Ojibwa is said to mean the puckered moccasin people or they say the French said the word meant pictograph. The Chippewa Indians mainly lived in the Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota and Michigan. There was 35,000 Ojibwa on the continent in the mid seventeenth century. They used the word Anishinabeg to describes themselves which means “original people.” The Ojibwa has its own cultural values like honesty, generosity, endurance, wisdom, and strength of character. All these values have been instilled through education and religious practice. The tribe has had ties with the French and even helped the French fight against the British in the French and Indian war. The French traders would even wed Chippewa women. The family was of great importance to the Ojibwa tribes. Each person in the Ojibwa family has its own role to ensure that things are done correctly. In the Ojibwa community, the roles between males and females were seen as complementary. The males would do the hunting and go to war if needed. The men would also be the ones that do trading and negotiation with the Europeans after the first contact. They usually hold leadership positions. Even though the society was usually not as organized, there was still need for leaders. People would gain rank as great warriors, religious leaders, and civil leaders. The most respected in the towns would be the shaman because of his
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