Explore How the Theme of Isolation Is Used in of Jane Eyre with Particular Focus on the Opening Chapters

3688 Words Feb 12th, 2007 15 Pages
I will be exploring how the theme of isolation is used throughout the novel "Jane Eyre" written by Charlotte Bronte, with particular focus on the opening chapters.
When Charlotte Bronte wrote "Jane Eyre" in 1847, it became an immediate bestseller. It contained themes of which were previously rarely brought to light and of which many believed to be controversial, such as women's place in the Victorian society, of which Bronte lived in.
"Jane Eyre" was written in first person narrative. This technique immediately allows the reader to relate to and connect with the main character's emotions and experiences, and her isolation.
In this book, the author, Charlotte Bronte, has chosen to take an almost autobiographical approach to the plot. At
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In reading her volume, Jane takes particular notice of certain aspects of the book, such as: "the solitary rocks and promontories" and "the bleak shores". This could be yet another subtle reflection of her life, and the direct reference to solitariness shows her introverted lifestyle and personality. Charlotte Bronte then goes onto describe how "the clear panes of glass, were protecting, but not separating me [Jane] from the drear November day". This could be interpreted as meaning that although Jane is protected from the realities of life outside Gateshead, as she is always isolated inside the house and its' grounds, she is not really separated from the harsh realities of life itself, as she believes she is suffering a much more cruel life locked inside.

The use of sympathetic background, in the description of the "drear November day" the other side of the window directly reflects the disposition of her own life, and therefore endorses the previous statements. "Afar, it offered a pale blank of mist and cloud; near a scene of wet lawn and storm beat shrub, with ceaseless rain sweeping away wildly before a long and lamenting blast."
This description on page 2 of Jane's view from her window describes that of lawns, shrubs and clouds, of which are usually thought of as generally pleasant, but Bronte has carefully chosen adjectives to convert them
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