Hamlets Tragic Flaw Essay

692 Words Oct 23rd, 1999 3 Pages
Hamlet’s Tragic Flaw It is better not to put off till tomorrow what you can do today. Many consequences can arise when one procrastinates. An example of this is found in Shakespeare’s Hamlet through the depiction of the central character. Although Hamlet is characterized as daring, brave, loyal, and intelligent, he is overwhelmed by his own conscience. The tragic hero is defined as one whose downfall is brought about due to their tragic flaw. Hamlet’s inability to act on his father’s murder, his mother’s marriage, and his uncle assuming of the thrown are all evidence of his tragic flaw of procrastination. “Revenge his foul and most unnatural murder” demands the ghost in (Act I, Scene …show more content…
While Hamlet is suppressing his feelings, he becomes more enraged at their attempts to calm him. Gertrude is also aware of Hamlet’s feelings for Ophelia and uses this as an excuse for Hamlet’s actions. Hamlet has ample time to confess the cause of his madness. Unfortunately, Hamlet allows his mother to think he is madly in love rather than tell the truth. After Hamlet delivers his play and sees guilt in his uncle, Gertrude sends for Hamlet. Instead of doing physical damage to his mother, he insist on her confession. If not for Hamlet’s procrastination, her confession could have taken place earlier in the play. This could save him from a great deal of pain and leave his thoughts for other problems. Hamlet’s biggest obstacle in avenging his father’s murder is Claudius being crowned king. With Claudius being in such a powerful position, Hamlet has to be cautious in his actions. Hamlet not only has to kill his father’s murderer, but the king as well. The church was against the wedding from the start and would side with Hamlet. Instead of Hamlet denouncing his mother’s wedding and the crowning of his uncle, he is silent. During the play, Claudius shouts "Give me some light. Away" and Hamlet was sure of his uncle’s guilt (Act III, Scene 2, Line 152). This was the perfect time for Hamlet to face Claudius. The king was in a venerable state and could have been easily dethroned.
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