Horror and Destruction of Auschwitz Death Camps Essay

666 Words 3 Pages
Of all of the death camps built by the Nazis during World War II, none was larger or more destructive than the terrifying Auschwitz camp. Auschwitz was built by the Nazis in 1940, in Oswiecim, Poland, and was composed of three main parts. Auschwitz I was built in June 1940 and was intended to hold and kill Polish political prisoners. Auschwitz II-Birkenau, which opened October 1941, was larger and could contain over 100,000 inmates. Auschwitz III-Monowitz provided slave labor for a plant close by. In addition, there were many sub-camps. The most important camp at Auschwitz designed for the extermination of many people was Birkenau; numerous gas chambers and crematoria were established there, mainly to murder and incinerate Jews as …show more content…
Of all of the death camps built by the Nazis during World War II, none was larger or more destructive than the terrifying Auschwitz camp. Auschwitz was built by the Nazis in 1940, in Oswiecim, Poland, and was composed of three main parts. Auschwitz I was built in June 1940 and was intended to hold and kill Polish political prisoners. Auschwitz II-Birkenau, which opened October 1941, was larger and could contain over 100,000 inmates. Auschwitz III-Monowitz provided slave labor for a plant close by. In addition, there were many sub-camps. The most important camp at Auschwitz designed for the extermination of many people was Birkenau; numerous gas chambers and crematoria were established there, mainly to murder and incinerate Jews as part of Adolf Hitler's Final Solution. In addition, Birkenau was also the place where chief medical officer Dr Josef Mengele, also regarded as the "Angel of Death," carried out his gruesome and sadistic medical "experiments," some of which included surgery without anesthesia and procedures that deliberately caused disability and death. Trains and cattle wagons were the main ways of transportation for the victims, mostly made up of Jews, to Auschwitz-Birkenau. When they arrived at the camp, they were greeted with the phrase "Arbeit macht frei," which means "Work brings freedom." This ironic phrase has become a symbolic reference to the horrific experience of the Holocaust; the sign at the gates of Auschwitz remains today as

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