How Did The Millet System In The Ottoman Empire

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Introduction
The Ottoman Empire was an empire that came to its rise during the year 1299, the empire was a strong follower of the Islamic religion, they were also one of the biggest reasons for the spreading of the religion. The Holy crusades ended during the year 1291, this was just a few years before the Ottoman empire was founded. The Religious wars were far from finished though, religions would keep on fighting for their beliefs for a long time, even until the current day. The Ottoman Empire did not have as much discrimination towards other religions though, they instead invited them through a system called Millet.
The millet system allowed for minorities to live within the empire under a separate court of law. This made it possible
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The Millets were societies of non-muslims living in the Ottoman Empire under their own rule. The word “Millet” means “religious community” or “people” in Turkish, and it was quite fitting for its purpose.
The system existed since the beginning of the empire, but the first Orthodox Christian society didn't appear till 1454. The Millet communities inside of the empire got their own freedom and had the right to rule on their own through a patriarch. The patriarch was given a substantial amount of power by the Ottoman sultan to rule over the non-muslim community. Inside the Millets, the people were given the rights to speak their own language, develop their own establishments such as schools and churches, and they also got to collect their own taxes inside the Millet.
Most of the Millets also had to pay a tax to the Ottoman empire, and quite a substantial amount at that, though some Millets were exempted from having to pay this tax if they had been recognized to be of great use or assistance to the Ottoman Empire.

The Devshirme
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Some of the “villages” at times had to give away about 20% of the boys in the Millet or community, though this was almost only in the conquered states like the Balkan provinces.
When these kids were taken they were first examined to see if they were more suited for brains or brawns. After that, they were taken to the “Palace school” where they were taught calligraphy, maths, horsemanship, and some were also taught weapon mastery, they were then also taught many different languages such as Turkish, Arabic and Persian. The school was considered as one of the best in the Islamic world.
After graduation, many of these children went on to take high positions in the empire. Because the boys were extremely loyal towards the empire, they often got into very high positions with high importance, there are records showing that a lot of the boys became either scribes, pages, governors, gatekeepers, guards or soldiers in the Janissaries, there are even records stating that some of them became prime
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