Philosophy Are Filled With Debates, Arguments, And Theories

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Annals of Philosophy are filled with debates, arguments, and theories. One such argument would be that it is not possible to possess morality without the belief in a personal god. There are as many differing opinions on this subject as there are philosophers amongst us. I believe that believing in a god has nothing to do with moral awareness and action. I am not debating that there is a god, I am just concerned with whether or not it is possible to act morally without the belief in one. Just for clarification purposes, the term moral means “concerned with the principles of right and wrong behavior and the goodness or badness of human character” (google.com). In other words, being “a person 's standards of behavior or…show more content…
This causes a myriad of problems. Consider that if He were to command rape or murder, these actions would become morally good and the right thing to do. First, Kant’s argument for this existence of god is explained as a person doing something because of a moral duty to do so. For example, a person who volunteers to feed the needy at a food bank. The volunteer has nothing to gain for themselves. They are not fulfilling a community service obligation as handed down by a judge, nor are they being forced to give of their time by a higher power who had promised rewards as kind of a quid pro quo agreement. Kant asserts that moral actions must be done for the sake of duty and not from any desire for personal reward or recognition. This ability to use sovereign reason, according to Kant, comes from an instinctive sense of duty communal to all rational individuals and develops goodwill. From a utilitarian point of view, the measure of good and evil of an action is calculated by the resulting pleasure or pain. Kant insisted that human beings should never be used as a means to an end, believing it violated the dignity of the person. There is also Friedrich Nietzsche. Nietzsche believed that religion had been perverted by the practices of Christianity and Judaism, and subsequently blamed them for
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