Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier Essay

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Rebecca is a beautiful, haunting, gripping tale of love, hate and deceit told in the simplest and most endearing manner by Daphne Du
Maurier.

'Rebecca' is a beautiful, haunting, gripping tale of love, hate and deceit told in the simplest and most endearing manner by Daphne Du
Maurier. Du Maurier weaves a beautiful web of mystery that holds you captive until the very end of the novel. We readers feel the anxiety, apprehension and fear that the protagonist describes and together we move through each chapter with an anxiety that only ends with the end of the novel itself. I think du Maurier's greatest accomplishment in this book, character-wise, is the way she develops Rebecca, who is already dead when the main action of the
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Hopper's calculated meetings that her companion meets Max De Winter who is pointed out to her as "the man who owns Manderly..." and a widower who cant get over his wife's death. Their relationship takes form the next day when Max invites her to join his table for lunch and subsequently on a drive. They fall in love and marry in haste arriving at Manderly eight months after Rebecca's death.

Shy, vulnerable and in total awe of Manderly, Manderly's new mistress is everything that Rebecca wasn't. She falls an easy prey to Rebecca's faithful servant Mrs. Danvers who with her "hollow eyes" and
"parchment white" face is a constant reminder that Rebecca shades all...even, Max's love for her. Her days at Manderly are filled with apprehension and anxiety. Rebecca's shadow looms large over her, her presence fills the house kept alive by Mrs. Danvers who, she finds to her horror, preserves Rebecca's room just as it was the night before her drowning accident. She is scared and intimidated by Mrs. Danvers whose love and allegiance to her dead mistress is unsettling to both her and us readers.

The story revolves around the unusual marriage of the young, unworldly narrator (whose first name is never revealed, one of the book's charming idiosyncrasies) to the brooding 'landed gentleman,' Maxim de
Winter. When she arrives at his grand country manor, Manderly (the house is perhaps the book's most potent character), she is immediately
confronted
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