Salt Reduction: What Happens When You Comsume to Much Sodium?

1670 Words 7 Pages
Based on a ubiquitous biologic principle, there is a physiologic, healthy consumption range for all essential nutrients to maintain an optimum health status. Eaton and Konner (1985) had highlighted in their study that there is an optimum characteristic and composition of food that every organism, including human, is genetically registered to consume and metabolize. Likewise, sodium as one of the key fundamental nutrients is no exception to this rule (Karppanen and Mervaala, 2006). Therefore, if sodium consumption is less than the physiologic range for extended periods, adverse deficiency circumstances are likely to develop. On the contrary, if consumption of sodium surpasses the physiologic range for prolonged periods, detrimental …show more content…
Based on a ubiquitous biologic principle, there is a physiologic, healthy consumption range for all essential nutrients to maintain an optimum health status. Eaton and Konner (1985) had highlighted in their study that there is an optimum characteristic and composition of food that every organism, including human, is genetically registered to consume and metabolize. Likewise, sodium as one of the key fundamental nutrients is no exception to this rule (Karppanen and Mervaala, 2006). Therefore, if sodium consumption is less than the physiologic range for extended periods, adverse deficiency circumstances are likely to develop. On the contrary, if consumption of sodium surpasses the physiologic range for prolonged periods, detrimental consequences and even severe toxicity are likely to develop.

The vast dietary changes that occurred during the 20th century, tend to be incompatible with our metabolic system and often as a result, produce a series of diseases (Eaton et al., 1997). Apart from this continuous changes in diet with respect to that of our ancestors, one of the main inconsistencies that have been distinguished is the significant difference in sodium (Na) and potassium (K) consumption (Eaton et al., 1997). In this aspect, the current K intake is about 25% that was estimated during the Paleolithic Period, while Na intake is five times higher (Figure 1, Quilez and Salas-Salvado, 2012, p.667). This huge disparity in the Na/K ratio, which is currently between 0.13 to
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