Single Sex Education Essay

1074 Words5 Pages
Introduction:
Single sex education began in 1890, in England, for men only. Education was believed to be for men only because men usually took over the family by providing funds necessary to run a household.
Usually women learned only fundamental concepts, such as how to cook, clean, sew and care for children. Women did not attend school; rather, they learned the skill of reading and writing, and some acquired mathematics through private lessons or a tutor, but if they were rich they were sent to a boarding school where the emphasis would be on elegant accomplishments like music, dancing, drawing, painting, embroidery, and even sometimes French. Women were not allowed to further their education after grammar school. If they wished, they
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In 1968, the U.S Department of Education, once the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, issued a declaration saying that school officials are responsible for providing equal educational opportunities for all, regardless of one’s nationality, race, or color(Salomone 15.) Although these laws gave each person the right to attend a school of his or her choice, the creation of single sex schools brought a new definition to education. “The single-sex format creates opportunities that don’t exist in the coed classroom” (Sax 1/11).
Students who attend single sex high schools have a greater chance of being less distracted than in a coeducational high school.
Boys tend to lessen their aggressive edge and become communal in a single sex setting. They can just be boys and not have to worry about what girls may say because they are not in the same school. Boys can enjoy poetry and play in an orchestra. This is a tremendous contrast to a co-educational high school setting.
Girls drop their shyness and begin to take risks in a single sex school setting. They become more competitive. They embrace sports like field hockey and soccer with enthusiasm without worrying about appearing like tom boys.
Young Teenagers are subjected to an inundation of pressure to become adults before they are ready to do so. They grow up too swiftly. Single sex education is a gentler, more controlled atmosphere.
On the contrary: some public schools which have adopted
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