The Code Switching Language Teaching

1404 Words6 Pages
The code switching language taught me a new way to reach my future students on a grammatical level in any part of the state I choose to teach in. Code-switching is teaching that informal and formal language is neither incorrect nor correct but which form is appropriate for the situation that the student is in. The method improves grammar and the students grasp on written and spoken English, while not focusing on the students’ ability to write a correct sentence. While learning about code-switching the process reminded me of an urban slang dictionary being used. A code-switching lesson consists of four individual lessons to be used in order and repeated if the concept is not grasped. The first lesson is identifying the pattern that is…show more content…
Learning about dialects was another interesting topic we discussed in class, the topic made me really think deep about what kind of dialect I use in everyday life. Dialects are a specific variation of a language in a particular region or ethic group with individualized phonological features to wide range of groups. A large part of decoding dialects is the understanding of the International Phonetic Alphabet, phonology, and phonemes used in the different areas you might be teaching in. Phonology is the study of sound and phonemes is the smallest unit of sound both are key to use and listen for when in a new region of the country. The International Phonetic Alphabet represents the sounds letters make for a spoken language and when written the word reads as a certain dialect. Lexical features of dialects are the preferred terms of words used in certain dialects with different synonyms used by other dialects. Learning about dialects also taught me how people code-switch from home to public settings. I speak a Northern Jersey with a small amount of classic southern mixed into my dialect. Allowing me to understand multiple dialects including Standard English. My stronger northern accent may cause me teaching in areas with a strong southern accent to be a little bit of a struggle with my students and myself.
Get Access