The Constitution Of The United States

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The Constitution of the United States divide powers between both Congress and President in a way to prevent tyranny. The legislative and executive branches have major roles in America’s form of government. Each have significant roles but would overlay within each other especially when it comes to foreign policy. In the process of foreign policy, both sides tend to collide whether it may be Congress against the executive branch or vice versa. It becomes something contradictory in which Political Scientist Edwin Corwin calls it an “invitation to struggle”. This paper looks to examine the “struggle” in detail, set out the roles and responsibilities of Congress and the President in foreign policy as stated by the Constitution and then explain…show more content…
It is also Congress who were given power to raise and support armies. Although we’ve seen and discussed in the pass where many presidents have sent troops into foreign land many times without any permission from Congress. This is where the tensions tend to occur between these two sides. Many historians and political scientists have highlighted that the Constitution gives a complete outline of sharing powers but on the contrary it doesn’t clearly states who should be in the charge of decision making events. So the question that raises debate, in the making of foreign policy, what has been the role of Congress and what powers does the President have possession of ? The Constitution splits foreign policy powers between President and Congress but like in the matter of war, it isn’t done in a conclusive matter. Many say that the Constitution does not include substance as to who officially determines policy. Edward Corwin’s The President, Office and Powers states: “What the Constitution does and all that it does is to confer on the President certain powers capable of affecting our foreign relations, and certain other powers of the same general kind on the Senate, and still other such powers on Congress, but which of these organs shall have the decisive and final voice in determining the course of the American nation is left for events to resolve”. With such complications, it becomes difficult to implement a solid foreign
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