The Development Of New Hybrids For The Wine Industry

1040 Words5 Pages
The Development of New Hybrids for the Wine Industry, ... Why Bother?, or The Answer to Our Problems? Introduction For certain Wine viticulturists the harsh winters have always been a problem . Its difficult to grow most grape varieties in these brutal winter conditions . I have chosen an article that was published in the vueweekly (which is an independent publication owned by Postvue Publication Inc, an Alberta corporation). The article is subjected as “ The hype about Hybrids “ and written by Mel Priestly in 2014 . She is a dish editor,a critic cum editor for vueweekly as well as a certified sommelier which definitely makes this article a very credible source for review purposes . This article talks about the impression people…show more content…
These hybrid grape wines are usually described as foxy and reminiscent to a wet dog which is not the quality customers look out for . Not to mention the fact that they are also quite inferior as compared to the vinifera wines which led to many european nations banning hybrid grape variety wines . There are however exceptions and until recently Canada was popularly known as the home to hybrid grape varieties because they could stand harsh winters which is common in that country. Therefore Canadian winegrowers focused on hardy, native North American or hybrid varieties.Some of Canada’s wine-growing areas (especially the north of the Okanagan Valley, the Niagara region , Nova Scotia and places in Quebec) often still grow hybrids, as they can survive whereas vinifera varieties simply die. The white grape hybrid Vidal is used to create a wide variety of commonly drunk icewine in Niagara, as its thick skin permits it to remain intact at freezing temperatures as opposed to its vinifera cousins. Many of the Canadian wineries also make wines from red hybrid grapes, both as a varietal wine and blended with vinifera varieties: Marechal Foch (often just called Foch), Baco Noir and Leon Millot are most common. Several wineries in the United States also use many of these grapes, typically in in wine regions that, like those in Canada, struggle to grow vinifera due to harsh and brutal winters. The white hybrid Seyval Blanc is common in New
Open Document