The Dropout Crisis Essay

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The Dropout Crisis In a rural area just outside of Chicago, 150 students marched at the graduation ceremony. That is a far cry from the 300 students that enrolled as freshman just four years ago. This is not an inner city school, but it is a reminder that there is a crisis in our nation. The high school dropout problem is everywhere. Speakers at graduation ceremonies talk about the aspirations and big dreams of the graduating class. No one ever mentions or notices the bleak futures of their peers who chose to dropout before receiving their diplomas. The reasons for dropping out vary by race, sex and community. Teenagers live in the present moment, never looking too far ahead to realize what the consequences could be if they left high…show more content…
In addition, when parents don’t get involved with the students school life, students find it easier to fall through the cracks and end up dropping out. “Thirty eight percent believed they had “too much freedom” and not enough rules”. It was too easy to skip class or engage in activities outside of schools,” (Bridgeland 4). Some of those outside activities are the use of drugs and entry into gangs. Without supervision, kids will begin using, abusing and selling drugs. When this happens, attendance begins to suffer and the cycle of failing grades begins to develop, leading to early departure from high school. Gang members tell students that going to school and doing homework is for bookworms. They invite them into the gangs with a promise of a better lifestyle. All of these factors lead to many consequences. Life becomes difficult for dropouts and is a tremendous cost imposition on our entire nation. For instance, “dropouts from the class of 2008 alone, cost the nation more than $319 billion in lost wages over the course of their lifetimes,” (High School Dropouts 2). This continues to lower the state and federal income tax revenues. No work means no payments into income tax and social security systems. These individuals are more likely to rely on Medicaid, housing assistance and food stamps. This is all at a great cost to the public. “Currently this Congress
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