The Impact of Path-Goal Leadership Styles on Work Group

5648 WordsJan 19, 201123 Pages
The Impact of Path-Goal Leadership Styles on Work Group Effectiveness and Turnover Intention Marva L Dixon, Laura Kozloski Hart. Journal of Managerial Issues. Pittsburg:Spring 2010. Vol. 22, Iss. 1, p. 52-69,6-7 (20 pp.) | Abstract (Summary) Leaders continuously seek to improve organizational performance and enhance work group effectiveness to drive competitiveness and curtail the cost of employee turnover. The diversity of many work groups in the U.S. creates potential benefits and challenges for their leaders. Using data gathered from a manufacturing facility in southeastern U.S., this study examines how Path-Goal leadership styles, diversity, work group effectiveness, and work group members' turnover intention are related.…show more content…
When individuals interact with people whom they perceive as different, they tend to classify themselves and those people into social categories (Cox and Nkomo, 1990). Research has found that, early in the life of a work group, members focus on the visible aspects of diversity such as gender, race/ethnicity, and age. As group members interact, they redirect their attention to other members' non-visible features such as personality, education, expertise, values, and communication styles (Cunningham and Sagas, 2004; Hobman et al., 2004, 2003; Salomon and Schork, 2003; Richard et al, 2002; Caudron, 1994). Employees with more perceived value/informational dissimilarity with their leaders tend to be less satisfied with them and have weaker organizational attachment that those with high perceived similarity (Lankau et al., 2007). Diverse work groups present their leaders with challenges and benefits. Among the challenges are potentially unfavorable interpersonal relationships, impeded intra-group communication, low group cohesiveness, and high employee turnover (Joplin and Daus, 1997; Schneider, 1987; Pfeffer, 1983). If not managed correctly, diversity can negatively affect work group members' retention, organizational commitment, and productivity, harming the
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