The Movement Of The Negro World

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Introduction In a decade’s time, Marcus Moziah Garvey entered United States, at the age of 28, and cultivated the American Negro through his oratory that is seen as the awaken of Black Nationalism. Garvey’s work does not end in America, he’s efforts were world-wide but not limited to Africa to Nova Scotia, and South America. It has been stated that Garvey raised more money and grew a membership than any other Negro organization to date. Coined as the Black Moses, Garvey’s stated “I know no national boundary where the Negro is concerned. The whole world is my province until Africa is free.” Garvey evoke the message to his listeners that black skin was not to be shamed but black skin exemplifies national greatness. It is stated that his…show more content…
I wish to further analyze how the organizing strategy with the United Negro Improvement Association has been utilized, its impact, strengths and weaknesses of the approach, contemporary relevance, and implications for practice. Biography Marcus Garvey was born to Marcus and Sarah Garvey, on August 17, 1887 in a little town named St. Ann’s Bay in Jamaica. Hoping that one day her new born son would lead his people, his mother, Sarah, wanted to make his middle name Moses. Garvey’s father was not a religious man, but comprised with Moziah as Garvey’s middle name. His parents were of the unmixed Negro stock, and his father was of the Maroons. Maroons were descendants of Africans who fought and escaped from slavery and established free communities in the mountainous interior of Jamaica during the era of slavery. Marcus Garvey was recognized a glorified as a full-blooded black man with no taint of a white in his blood. Marcus Garvey was the youngest of eleven children. Most of his siblings died young. Marcus and his sister, Indiana, were the only two to live to maturity. The family were very well-off; however, Garvey Sr. experienced some misfortune and lost most of his property. At the age of 14, Marcus Garvey was forced to quit school and begin working. It was too at this age that Garvey describe the first moment he heard of the term,
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