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The Raven Research Paper

Decent Essays
“[He] attended a lot of funerals. When he wasn’t going to funerals, he wrote stories about dead people (or soon-to-be-dead people) living in torture chambers, haunted houses, and other creepy locales with zero chance of escape….” an author writes in Edgar Allan Poe's biography. Poe is an author who has experienced multiple catastrophic events could have done this. With much experience in death, Edgar Allan Poe had a brutal, devastating, and depressing life. Authors often write what they feel and experience in life. Surrounded by death most his stories too were about death. In the story The Tell-Tale Heart Poe writes about a man is killed because he has a hideous eye. One of his bestsellers, the Raven, is about a man who believes that a bird…show more content…
After the death of his beloved wife, Edgar Allan Poe found himself writing so others could understand his pain and sorrow. In the story, Poe refers the want to be with loved ones be telling the readers the raven is the character’s dead wife.

Depressed at an early age this incredibly talented author resorted to drinking to reveal him from some of the pain, with many deaths and being surrounded by despair he quickly became an alcoholic. The story The Cask of Amontillado is about an alcoholic man who buries another man alive for insulting his name many times. Going this extreme means he would have to have a true understanding of revenge making the story have a creepy feel.

Edgar Allan Poe’s life works are a reflection of who he is may it be crazy, depressing, or frightening. His background is what makes him a unique writer, all the horror he writes about is real and he has faced. He takes the main idea from his own life and adds details to describe how he feels making his story realistically horrific because it is real. Many authors just take ideas out of their brain which is great but writing book and poems from your own life, things that really happen is taking it to the next level making it exciting and
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