The Unethical Behavior of Biegler and McCarthy in Anatomy of a Murder and the Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct

652 WordsFeb 19, 20183 Pages
After reviewing the two scenes from an Anatomy of a Murder and the Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct, it’s clear that Biegler and McCarthy behaved unethically; because he disclosed client information without consent and he indirectly imposed what defense Lieutenant Manion should plea. In the first scene, Biegler and McCarthy are discussing Biegler’s first visit with Mr. Manion and whether or not he was going to take the case; McCarthy also proposes Biegler guide Mr.Manion into a defense. In the second scene, Biegler meets with Mr.Manion for the second time and he indirectly guides him into a plea of insanity. In each of these scenes, several Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct were violated such as: Maryland Rule 16-812 (1.6) (a), Maryland Rule 16-812 (1.6) (5) (b), Maryland Rule 16-812 (8.4) (a), and Maryland Rule 16-812 (8.4) (c). Based on Biegler’s background as a lawyer, he should have known the rules about disclosing and discussing information about a client’s case. In the first scene between Biegler and McCarthy, information about the representation of Lieutenant Manion was discussed and McCarthy suggested that Biegler give Mr. Manion options for a defense. Biegler told McCarthy that he did not coach Mr. Manion into a fake story and he gave his opinion of Mr.Manions character as being insolent and hostile; hence the reason why he felt he was not fit to take the case. This discussion between Biegler and McCarthy violated the Maryland Rules of Professional

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