Chemistry
Chemistry
9th Edition
ISBN: 9781133611097
Author: Steven S. Zumdahl
Publisher: Cengage Learning
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One of the main buffering systems in blood consists of carbonic acid and bicarbonate ion. most of the carbonic acid is actually dissolved carbon dioxide. Write an equation showing how this buffering system would neutralize glycolic acid that might enter the blood from ethylene glycol poisoning. Suppose a cat has 0.15mole of bicarbonate ion and 0.15mole carbonic acid in its bloodstream. How many grams of glycolic acid could be neutralized before the buffering system in the blood is overwhelmed?

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