Scottsboro Trials Essay

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    Scottsboro Trial

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    In Scottsboro, Alabama, March 9, 1931 nine African american boys, Olen Montgomery, Clarence Norris, Haywood Patterson, Ozie Powell, Willie Roberson, Charles Weems, Eugene Williams, Andy Wright, and Roy Wright were incriminated of rapeing two white women on the subway. As they were accused of raping Ruby Bates and Victoria Price they were put on trial. This trail was long and unfair. On the train the boys were evidently taken away by the sheriff, once Ruby told a posse member (sheriff/police) of

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    The Scottsboro Trial

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    Paper How did the Scottsboro Trials change the face of racism in the 1930's? In the past people have been treated differently just because of the pigment of their skin. The Scottsboro boys were treated like this and were falsely accused of crime by white people. They faced many years of white bias, but they continued to fight for what they believed in. They fought the clutches of racism and poverty just like Tom Robinson did in the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. The Scottsboro Trials relate to the novel

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    The Scottsboro Trials

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    The Scottsboro trials happened in the 1931 and dragged on for years. These cases were solely based on the prejudice surrounding blacks and gender. The cases presented in the Scottsboro Film represented the fight for justice. Nine boys were wrongfully arrested and imprisoned for years while society used these young black mens oppression to further its own agenda.These cases ruined the life of nine young men but they also helped make dramatic, vital changes in the criminal justice system and the constitution

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    The Scottsboro Trial

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    The Scottsboro Trials were among the largest legal injustices in the South. The events that started the trials began in the early spring of 1931, when nine young black men were falsely accused of raping two white women on a train. The cases were tried and appealed in Alabama and twice argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. The state pursued the case and all-white juries delivered guilty verdicts that initially carried the death penalty. Several of the accused were sentenced to prison terms and all

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    The final inspiration for the book is the Scottsboro trials. The Scottsboro trials were a series of court cases for nine black young men, who were falsely accused of raping two white women (Anderson). The grueling cases lasted for many years. The verdict of one of the first cases was the men were guilty. The case eventually made its was up to the Supreme Court where more evidence was discovered. Which was that the men were riding a train car to Alabama in 1931, while the women were on a completely

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    racist the Scottsboro Trials, were definitely not just another ordinary case. The Scottsboro Trials changed how America viewed segregation. The nine young men, who hopped onto that train that day, were innocent and harmless. The Scottsboro Trials revealed the unjust treatment that African Americans faced outside of the Harlem Renaissance and changed views on segregation. Boarding the train from Chattanooga to Memphis seems like an innocent thing to do (“UMKC” par. 2). For the Scottsboro boys, boarding

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    The Scottsboro Trials Racism wasted the lives of nine young, black men. In a trial where the only plausible evidence proved their innocence, they were still convicted. They were accused of rape, but all it was was an accusation. There was nothing to back it up. They endured many trials almost all of which had prejudice juries. This is the story of nine young men who had little, and then had everything taken away from them. On March 24, 1931, nine black youths

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    this case. It was taken as a joke and it was laughed about rather than frowned upon. Justice was snatched away because of this vulgar “joke”. The Scottsboro Boys Trial, that took place in Alabama from 1931 to 1937, revealed the consequences of false accusations, explained the loss of innocence, and established the miscarriage of justice. The Scottsboro Trials had set a limit to falsely accusing someone and created a legacy of racism that had never been forgotten. “Also discovered aboard were two white

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    Today, in the United States, people are not punished for the color of their skin, back in the 1930s, a person’s race was taken into consideration when in court. There are many instances of racism in both trials, which impacted the outcome. The Scottsboro Trial consisted of two white girls and a group of black youths. 21 year old Victoria Price and 17 year old Ruby Bates were on a train ride back to their hometown, Huntsville, with a group of seven white boys. A group of 12- 15 black youths were

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    The Scottsboro Boys Trial was a huge case against nine African American men who between the ages 13-19 were accused for sexually assaulting two caucasian women on a train they were falsely and wrongly accused. This case started in 1931 on a train near Paint Rock, Alabama. Eight of the nine young men were convicted and sentenced to death the ninth was sentenced to life in prison. These young men should not have been mistreated while being held and tried without evidence based on their race and sentenced

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