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  • Easter Island 's History And Decline

    1305 Words  | 6 Pages

    In the article by Jared Diamond, many interesting theories are discussed about Easter Island’s history and decline. Diamond makes connections to the environmental challenges we face today and he compares the catastrophe of Easter Island to our current over consumption of natural resources. While this article makes for an interesting read, much of it is offered from a single perspective and little counter evidence is offered. The author writes in a way that could engage a non-academic audience who

  • Easter Island Effect

    833 Words  | 4 Pages

    Easter Island What happened to Easter Island? Oliver Kirby - 14 November 2017 Easter Island My name is Oliver Kirby and I am a historian. For many years now I have been deeply invested in the study of South American and Polynesian history. The magazine ‘The Good Weekend’ approached me with an opportunity to write an article discussing the rise and expansion of Easter Island and then its decline. I will also be discussing if what happened to Easter Island is a microcosm of what might happen to

  • The Moai Statues of Easter Island: Rapa Nui Essay

    982 Words  | 4 Pages

    W4A1 Question 1: a. Why do you believe each culture undertook the creation of your selected monumental work of architecture and sculpture despite the difficulties of accomplishing them? What can we assume about a work of art without such knowledge? The moai statues of Easter Island, also known as Rapa Nui, are some of the most mysterious structures ever seen (Cothren & Stokstad, 2011, p.873). Easter Island is one of the most remote islands in the world. It is 2,300 miles from the coast of South

  • The Four Social Factors Of Rapa Nui

    1417 Words  | 6 Pages

    Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, is the eastern most island in the Polynesian region. The first European to discover the remote island was Jacob Roggeveen in 1722. When they arrived, there was over three thousand native inhabitants on the island. But, due to the kidnapping of over one thousand male slaves and sicknesses, by the year 1872 there were only approximately one hundred and seventy-five people left on the island. It declined further slowly into the 1880s but from there began to increase

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