Browne, M. N., & Keeley, S.M. (2010). Asking the right questions: A guide to critical thinking (10th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall.

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Browne, M. N., & Keeley, S.M. (2010). Asking the right questions: A guide to critical thinking (10th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall. Asking the Right Questions-11 Step Analysis Introduction “I know it’s good to be a critical thinker and to be able to ask lots of good questions, but I don’t know what questions to ask or how to ask them.” (Browne & Keeley, 2011) In our text “Asking the Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking (10th Ed.) The authors explore the benefits and necessity for critical thinking as it relates to the process of asking the right questions to make an informed decision and conclusion to an argument. The authors Browne and Keeley (2011) give two different approaches that can be taken in…show more content…
Lastly, Mary states that the proposal will not save any money. III. Which words or phrases are ambiguous? We often misunderstand what we read or hear because we presume that the meanings of the words are obvious (Browne & Keeley, 2011). When reading or listening to someone’s arguments and reasons you must force yourself to search for ambiguity. Within any argument that is read or heard there will always be obstacles. One obstacle is that many people assume that what they understand or think is the same as the author. The second obstacle is that people assume that words only have one single meaning (Browne & Keeley, 2011). In overcoming these obstacles, you must ask yourself “what do you mean by that” or “could any of these words or phrases have a different meaning” (Browne & Keeley, 2011). I find the entire conclusion to be somewhat ambiguous. Within the conclusion I have identified the word “challenge” as a key word that makes the statement ambiguous. In one instance to “challenge the proposal could mean to fight, confront or defy boldly, but in another context it could mean to formally question the legality or validity of the proposal. So what exactly does Mary mean by “challenge?” Another ambiguous phrase that I have identified is “lower wages.” Without specific information and evidence of wages for all members this can mean a multitude of things. Lower wages could be as low

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