Crystallization Paper

1612 WordsMar 24, 20137 Pages
Crystallization, as explained by Stendhal in his article titled “Love”, is the act one does when “falling in love.” This is the process of using your imagination and altering the identity of your lover to fit your own preferences. It is making an idealized and “crystallized” version of them to better your own convenience. According to Stendhal, there are seven “steps to love” and crystallization makes an appearance twice, emphasizing the influence it has on relationships. Stendhal has shown and explained that when couples are falling in love, sometimes they tend to not fall in love with the person but rather the crystallized “idea” of that person. As mentioned from the article, Stendhal refers the act of crystallization similar to throwing…show more content…
“Nora! Here we go again with you frivolous ideas! …” And once he is done scolding here he continues again with the pet names such as on page 3, “…There, there! My little singing bird mustn’t go drooping her wings, eh? …” The first couple of pages into the play suggests a lot on the quality and state of Torvald and Nora’s relationship. Whenever there was an argument, it wasn’t much of a two-sided argument but merely Torvald scolding Nora and then Nora saying, “as you wish Torvald.” And then Torvald continues again with the spoiling and showering of pet names. There was no actual discussion or agreement, which shows that after being married for eight years, Nora and Torvald don’t have much equal-sided conversations. In Nora and Torvald’s society, there was no such thing as gender equality. There were certain gender roles each has to play, Torvald being the big, busy, and important businessman and Nora being his wife and the mother of his children. The idea of “what’s mine is This being apparent on page 3 when Torvald became angry Nora suggested taking out a loan, he replied with, “Nora, Nora! Just like a woman! …” His reply shows that women shouldn’t suggest solutions to anything because they are just “…frivolous ideas…” and that women don’t have the same intellect as men do and that their solutions and opinions shouldn’t be bothered with. Another quote from the play that describes the
Open Document