Dream Beauty

998 Words4 Pages
Case 13: Supply Chain Management at Dream Beauty Company Dream Beauty (DB) Company is a manufacturer of consumer beauty supplies and cosmetics. Based out of Money City, Nevada, the company services its customers across the U.S. Recently, a supply chain expert was elected to the board of directors. With his insight into supply chain operations, heightened attention was turned toward that area. The costs in this area have been increasing, and management became very concerned about the issue. The company annual sales reached $130,000,000 for the first time since inception. Management believed that some of the increase in supply chain costs may be attributed to additional sales, but they were confident that other factors…show more content…
The company received a total of 3,600 orders. Retail orders amounted to 1,000; convenience stores to 2,500; and mass merchants had 100 orders. Each order has a corresponding delivery that is usually completed within the 3-day fulfillment cycle. The company’s practice has been to allocate logistics-related costs to its three channels based on their relative percentage of sales volume. The orders were shipped in 2,000 packages, with retail accounting for 800 packages, convenience stores for 1,100 packages and mass merchants for 100 packages. Packaging cost is estimated to be the same regardless of size. To service these orders, the company has maintained an inventory safety stock so that it can meet the level of service that it promises its customers (the 3-day fulfillment cycle). It is estimated that the company holds an average of 90 days’ inventory for retail, 60 days’ inventory for convenience stores, and 40 days’ inventory for mass merchants. The company’s cost accountant estimated the total carrying costs of inventory to be approximately 15 percent of total average annual inventory. These costs also include the cost of capital. The company’s customer base in convenience stores includes 13 different stores located in major U.S. cities. Table 1 provides a breakdown of sales per store, as well as the number of orders, and packages for each store. Historically, DB has offered its customers a
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