Logic and Perception Essay

1132 Words 5 Pages
Logic and Perception
     A human’s ability to think constitutes the human’s ability to live. Though life can and does go on without thought, thoughtless life would hold no meaning for most of us. Our thoughts fill our days and give meaning and purpose to our days to come. Through perception, we become aware of our environment through physical sensation (Merriam-Webster, 1997, p.546). Every single experience and observation, every smell and sound, that enters our mind through perception is then fused together and associated with other related fusions to become thought, …our very lives as we know them.
     The ability to sift through our thoughts and peel away the individual facets of
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Herein lays the real power of critical thinking. It seems to me that, logic, when applied to thoroughly objective critical thoughts, will produce a correct and well-founded answer.
     Therein also lays the problem: thoroughly objective critical thoughts. Our open-mindedness and objectivity are too often undermined by personal barriers which stem from “our exposure to cultural and genetic forces” (Kirby & Goodpaster, 1999, p. 13). These personal barriers include enculturation, self-concept, ego defenses, self-serving biases, expectations, emotions, and stress, among others. I have noticed that I tend to be most susceptible to enculturation and expectations/schemata.
     For example, I had never researched the role of the Pope before, and for that matter, I did not know much about the Catholic Church either. I was raised Protestant, mostly Baptist and Methodist. Even today, my family and I attend a Church of the Nazarene, which is somewhere in between the two. I always subscribed to the ethnocentric idea that Protestant was right and Catholic was wrong, but not because of any particular reason other than that this is what I was taught. If I were to be asked a question like, “What kind of role does the Pope play in the foreign affairs”, I would have replied with a quickness, “none”. Up until about two months ago, I thought that the Pope was simply a figurehead of the Catholic Church, a figurative