Operations and Logistics Management

3441 Words14 Pages
OPERATIONS AND LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT

Submit: 18/08/2008

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction…………………………………………………………………………… 03

Executive Summary…………………………………………………………………… 04

Operations strategy……………………………………………………………………. 05

Operations competitive dimensions…………………………………………………… 06

Capacity……………………………………………………………………………….. 07

Location……………………………………………………………………………….. 08

Total Quality Management……………………………………………………………. 09

Flexibility……………………………………………………………………………… 11

Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………….. 12

Recommendation……………………………………………………………………… 13

References……………………………………………………………………………… 14

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Operations Management is concerned with the managing of resources and activities that produce and deliver goods and services
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They reuse every leftover material in one way or the other. IKEA has over 9,500 products under its name (IKEA, 2008). The firm has a total of about 12,000 products in the entire product range. Each store carries a selection of 10,000 products, depending on store size; and the core range is the same worldwide. IKEA has over 200 stores in 30 countries around the world. This requires exceptional logistics and outstanding support staff as well as the best solutions. Europe is IKEA's largest purchasing market. In all, IKEA has 1,600 suppliers in 55 countries, and trades through local IKEA purchasing offices in 33 countries. In order to make sure that the operation management remains intact and at its most efficient level, it must incorporate the best technology and the right people.

OPERATIONS STRATEGY
The trend toward an integrated world economy and global competitive arena is forcing companies to design products for a global market, and to rationalise their production process so as to maximise corporate resources. Companies must coordinate their functional activities within a coherent strategy that addresses the global nature of their business. Unfortunately, when it comes to corporate strategy, most operation and logistics functions remain relegated to traditional tactical roles. Top management views operations and logistics as tactical in nature, design strategy without their input and relegates them to a cost-minimising role. There are many
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