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The Major Themes in Russell Freedman's Martha Graham, a Dancer’s Life

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Russell Freedman, an American biographer and author, was born in San Francisco in 1929, and he graduated the University of California, Berkeley. He used to be a reporter, an editor, and a publicist for various network television shows. Lincoln: A Photobiography, the 1988 Newbery Medal book, made his name as “a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children”, which infers that he was credible and highly respectable person at that time. He had published over 50 nonfiction books for young people, and usually wrote about animal behaviors and American history. Freedman’s famous books are Freedom Walkers, Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery, and Kids at Work. Moreover, Mr. Freedman chalked up several Newbery Honors, the May…show more content…
John Martin, the prominent critic, maintained that “No other dancer has yet touched the borders to which [Martha Graham] has extended the compass of movement… she has proved the body capable of a phenomenal range” (67). Hence, Martha’s unremitting effort had made impossible to possible, even though Martha’s limited conditions challenged her. Secondly, Martha’s another strength was revolutionary choreographing skills. Martha Graham marked her peak in the 1930s when she was creating a unique American style of dance. She wanted to “explore some of the forces that have shaped American culture, expressing through dance what is was like to be an American and what America meant to her” (75). Her first piece, Frontier, was a huge success, and she lasted choreographing to the death. Afterwards, Martha created nearly fifty new dances during the 1930s. In addition, Erick Hawkins, the introduction of male dancers, joined Martha’s company in 1938, and gave a huge impact on both Martha’s dance style and personal life. Before Erick appeared in Martha’s life, there was a limitation on her work. However, Martha was able to “explore love, jealousy, ad sexual passion in her dances” (85) such as Every Soul Is a Circus, Letter to the World, and Punch and the Judy. Overall, Martha’s choreographing skills had created a revolution in 1930s. Furthermore, Martha’s true friendship shows her
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