The Mind And Body Problem

1443 Words Mar 23rd, 2015 6 Pages
Abstract:
It is more reasonable to think that the patient has the usual range of mental states. Behaviours visually express mental states better than knowing if one has a Cartesian soul or the requirement of a normal human brain.
Body:
It is reasonable to think that the patient has the usual range of mental states because she is behaviourally indistinguishable from a normal human. Behaviours make mental states more evidentially obvious than knowing the brain state of a patient or if they have a Cartesian soul or not.
Doctor 4 provides the argument that since the patient is behaviourally indistinguishable from a normal human, she has the usual range of mental states. Gilbert Ryle’s view on the mind and body problem stems from “Philosophical or logical behaviourism” (Wk. 8-1, Slide 18). This view means that the idea that ascriptions of mental states correlates to “dispositions of behaviour” (Wk. 8-1, Slide 18). Behaviourists describe that saying, “I am in pain, does not report an inner state, but rather is part of being in pain” (Wk. 8-1, Slide 23). B.F. Skinner, a psychological behaviourist, also believes that mental states correlate to behaviours. Psychological Behaviourism is defined as, “studying the mind by studying behaviour” (Wk. 8-1, Slide 26). Skinner’s black box is an experiment to observe “stimulus/response pairings” (Wk. 8-1, Slide 26). Suppose we were to subject the patient to a number of stimuli in a test environment, and noted down her behaviours. We would…

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