The School Of The Montessori

1182 WordsApr 3, 20175 Pages
Despite the shutdown of Montessori schools because of Mussolini and fascist Italy, it is apparent that this would not be the end of the Montessori movement. Through the use of newspaper articles, and education journals, it is evident that her innovative techniques impacted multiple parts of the world. However, it can be argued that she was a driving force in the education systems of Great Britain, and the United States. The Montessori method peaked a lot of people’s interest in England. Many viewed this as innovative and wanted to know more about the process and the individual behind it. By 1912, numerous conferences were being held by English educators who would discuss the “merits and drawbacks of the Montessori system.” For example,…show more content…
After WWI, Montessori would return to England and conduct training courses. Many people expressed interest in attending, so much so that according to a newspaper article titled, “Dr. Montessori in London”, there was 2000 applicants for the course, and only 250 were granted the opportunity to attend. Despite the amount of interest in her method in England, her method was never officially institutionalised. This leads one to question why her method was never widely adopted in a place that showed much interest and treated her with respect. One can posit that this is because, like many educational theories, this method had its critics. Furthermore, Montessori was known for being highly critical of who would use her method and the way in which they practiced it. This leads one to argue that to have a method adopted into one’s education system, it must be malleable and open to adaptation to any newer methods coming out of the modern era. Having looked at how Montessori’s movement affected the education system of England during the early 20th century, it is also reasonable to look at how it has impacted other areas such as that of the United States in which Rita Kramer argues that this narrative “contains both striking parallels to as well as differences.” The first Montessori school in the United States was established by Anne George, a
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