The ' The Song Of Roland '

1289 WordsMar 23, 20156 Pages
The lives of knights depicted in the “The Song of Roland” are a demonstration of the fierce warriorship, aggressiveness, and deep faith of French Knights. A code of chivalry or gallantry existed among these men. At the top of this code of conduct were the highly regarded virtues of honor, faithfulness, courage, compassion, truth, and obedience. Noble knights prized the wares of their trade, such as fine warhorses, armory, battle skills, and fine regalia. In this epic poem, Roland and the other Knights show great obedience to their liege, King Charles. Roland volunteers for tough missions like leading the rear guard as the army made its way thru the Pyrenees Mountains. He promised the King that France would not lose any…show more content…
Knights were dedicated to their God and Church. These brave men truly believed that even though the battle was not always in their favor, God is the only one who could overcome the odds. Victories are God’s way of showing he approves of the knights mission. All things happen because God knows it will happen. Roland follows his lord and his God with complete faithfulness. “His whole sense of what a Christian knight must do is nearest to what pleases God, for it comes from God.” Many of the poems passages tell of the knights’ individual courage and their battle prowess. It seemed as though God was willing each of the French blows to be lethal and the Pagans blows to miss their mark. The warriors fought bravely no matter what the odds. They were not afraid to lead or make tactical decisions. They valued good judgment. At one point, Oliver questions whether Roland made a good decision not to call the army. At the end of the battle, as Roland lay dying, he also questioned his decision not to blow the Oliphant to alert King Charles’ Army. The poem notes that the idea of service to all is the same as service to the King. In the trial of Ganelon, they first see France as their complete realm of unity. They value their homes, families, and country. Ganelon’s treason was a threat to their France. The pagans do not identify that closely as a country. Good knights show compassion for their comrades and enemies
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