30. Explain subtractive cloning, and how it was used to discover the location of the Duchenne MuscularDystrophy gene (What was sonicated? What was digested? What was cloned and sequenced?).- whywouldn't this work with most other genes (like Cystic Fibrosis, which results from the deletion of a singiecodon)?• 31. If you digested the human genome with EcoRI and ran it on an agarose gel, what would you see? WnyrWhat would you need to do to "find" the gene of interest? What is this technique calied?• 32. How was RFLP analysis used to locate a phenotype/gene to a specific locus in the human genome, suchas in Huntington's Disease, Marfan's, CF, etc.?33. Why can A phage be used to take up sections of the human genome?34. What are the two limits of using genomic libraries to find specific genes?• 35. How do genomic and CDNA libraries differ? Which can be screened with antibodies and why?• 36. How are oligonucleotides, once important as probes for screening libraries, used today?• 37. What is the difference between cioning and PCR?38. Why did scientists push for the human genome to be sequenced?• 39. What modification of the nucleotides allowed for Sanger Sequencing? What effect do these nucleotideshave on replicating DNA?40. Compare chromosomal walking and shotgun sequencing. Which was more successful, and why?Recommended Questions:These questions are not mandatory to complete but are recommended to aid in your study and preparationfor the exam.Chapter 6.41. Define the following domains: SH2, SH3, Bromo, Chromo, PTB, SNARE, EF-Hand42. Describe the role/impact of each, and any important amino acids involved in the process:a. Allosteryb. Conformational changesc. "And" and "or" gatesd. AcetylationGlucon

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Asked Mar 3, 2020
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Question 39

30. Explain subtractive cloning, and how it was used to discover the location of the Duchenne Muscular
Dystrophy gene (What was sonicated? What was digested? What was cloned and sequenced?).- why
wouldn't this work with most other genes (like Cystic Fibrosis, which results from the deletion of a singie
codon)?
• 31. If you digested the human genome with EcoRI and ran it on an agarose gel, what would you see? Wnyr
What would you need to do to "find" the gene of interest? What is this technique calied?
• 32. How was RFLP analysis used to locate a phenotype/gene to a specific locus in the human genome, such
as in Huntington's Disease, Marfan's, CF, etc.?
33. Why can A phage be used to take up sections of the human genome?
34. What are the two limits of using genomic libraries to find specific genes?
• 35. How do genomic and CDNA libraries differ? Which can be screened with antibodies and why?
• 36. How are oligonucleotides, once important as probes for screening libraries, used today?
• 37. What is the difference between cioning and PCR?
38. Why did scientists push for the human genome to be sequenced?
• 39. What modification of the nucleotides allowed for Sanger Sequencing? What effect do these nucleotides
have on replicating DNA?
40. Compare chromosomal walking and shotgun sequencing. Which was more successful, and why?
Recommended Questions:
These questions are not mandatory to complete but are recommended to aid in your study and preparation
for the exam.
Chapter 6.
41. Define the following domains: SH2, SH3, Bromo, Chromo, PTB, SNARE, EF-Hand
42. Describe the role/impact of each, and any important amino acids involved in the process:
a. Allostery
b. Conformational changes
c. "And" and "or" gates
d. Acetylation
Glucon
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30. Explain subtractive cloning, and how it was used to discover the location of the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy gene (What was sonicated? What was digested? What was cloned and sequenced?).- why wouldn't this work with most other genes (like Cystic Fibrosis, which results from the deletion of a singie codon)? • 31. If you digested the human genome with EcoRI and ran it on an agarose gel, what would you see? Wnyr What would you need to do to "find" the gene of interest? What is this technique calied? • 32. How was RFLP analysis used to locate a phenotype/gene to a specific locus in the human genome, such as in Huntington's Disease, Marfan's, CF, etc.? 33. Why can A phage be used to take up sections of the human genome? 34. What are the two limits of using genomic libraries to find specific genes? • 35. How do genomic and CDNA libraries differ? Which can be screened with antibodies and why? • 36. How are oligonucleotides, once important as probes for screening libraries, used today? • 37. What is the difference between cioning and PCR? 38. Why did scientists push for the human genome to be sequenced? • 39. What modification of the nucleotides allowed for Sanger Sequencing? What effect do these nucleotides have on replicating DNA? 40. Compare chromosomal walking and shotgun sequencing. Which was more successful, and why? Recommended Questions: These questions are not mandatory to complete but are recommended to aid in your study and preparation for the exam. Chapter 6. 41. Define the following domains: SH2, SH3, Bromo, Chromo, PTB, SNARE, EF-Hand 42. Describe the role/impact of each, and any important amino acids involved in the process: a. Allostery b. Conformational changes c. "And" and "or" gates d. Acetylation Glucon

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