Cocaine Essay

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    Cocaine

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    COCAINE One of the most dangerous and widely abused drugs is cocaine, although they do not produce very severe physical dependent symptoms upon withdrawal. In the early 16th century, Francisco Pizzaro encountered the Inca; he found that royalty used the coca plant. This was the 1st contact Europeans had with this drug. In Peru this was considered to be “the gift of the Gods” (Craving for Ecstasy and Natural Highs: A Positive approach to mood Alteration Milkman, Sunderwirth) and was used in religious

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    Description Of Cocaine

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    In 2014, a report came out naming London the cocaine capital of Europe. The water system contains a higher concentration of this drug than in any other part of the continent, and bank notes are no longer tested for traces of cocaine. British police feel the test is a waste of time, as any money that has been in circulationf or a few weeks will have traces of cocaine. Although it is estimated that a large majority of the drugs being sold as cocaine don't actually contain the drug, this is still of

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    Cocaine Essay

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    Cocaine First of all this research paper will examine the history of cocaine, answer exactly who used it, effects of the drug and its addictive nature. People choose to write about cocaine so that others can clearly see and understand its historical origins and dangerous properties. Those who experiment with drugs should become aware of their dangerous effects and take caution. The more people that become knowledgeable about cocaine, the more they can protect themselves from seriously endangering

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    Absorption Of Cocaine

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    Absorption and Distribution of Cocaine Cocaine is most often administered via nasal insufflation, intravenous injection, the oral route and inhalation of crack cocaine vapours (unionized form of cocaine) (Fattinger et al., 2000). Cocaine is absorbed the fastest and has the most intense effects after smoking or intravenous injection. This is due to rapid absorption, distribution and low degrees of first-pass metabolism although nasal or oral routes are also common (figure 1; Fattinger et al., 2000)

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    Cocaine Addiction

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    country. It's also the time frame when cocaine became America's drug of choice. As the new drug flowed free in dance clubs all around the country, drug cocaine was the star of the evening. There was no negative stigma associated with people who chose to partake because everyone was doing it and law enforcement couldn't keep up. What Changed for Drug Cocaine? As the saying goes, "all good things must come to and end." America had its love affair with drug cocaine until the mid-1980s when the drug was

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    Cocaine Essay

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    Cocaine When you reach into the refrigerator for a Coca-Cola, do you ever wonder where it got its name? You might be surprised to find out! When coke was created 120 years ago, it contained cocaine (Bayer 27). At the time scientists did not realize that cocaine was addictive and dangerous. Scientists today know that cocaine is among the strongest stimulants known, and trying the drug even one time can cause heart attack, stroke, and even death. "Even the most in shape athlete could

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    Cocaine Abuse

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    Cocaine abuse has been a persistent health problem worldwide for many years (Platt, 2002). Adults aged 18 to 25 year have a higher rate of current cocaine use than any other age group, with 1.5 percent of young adults reporting past month cocaine use (The Science of Drug Abuse & Addiction , 2013). Every drug has a history as to how it came about, also, as to why it is used and or abused among adults. Each drug has its own chemical make-up, along with how that drug works in the human body. Treatment

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    Abuse Of Cocaine

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    Cocaine, a very powerful stimulant, affects the brain by blocking the receptor on the sending neurons responsible for the reuptake of Dopamine, Serotonin, and Norepinephrine. This disruption of reuptake causes the excess of the aforementioned neurotransmitters at the synaptic cleft to instead be entirely absorbed by the receiving neuron resulting in a high characteristic to the abuse of Cocaine, and the eventual crash as this interruption of reuptake leads to a depletion of the listed neurotransmitters

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    The Effects Of Cocaine

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    Common names for Cocaine are: Coke; Charlie; Snow; and ‘C’ Cocaine can be identified as a white powder which can then be snorted up a person’s nose, an alternative method to taking is to inject directly into the blood stream. Crack Cocaine comes about by chemically altering the Cocaine powder to form hard crystals, which can be known as ‘rocks’. The drug Cocaine alters chemical levels in the brain which can lead the user to have the ‘feel good’ factor. A ‘rush’ may be felt by the user when the

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    Mercantilism And Cocaine

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    From Tradition to Addiction; A Brief History of the Coca Leaf & Cocaine Today, the drug cocaine is widely known for its recreational uses, as well as its addictive properties. Roughly 500 hundred years ago the coca leaf was introduced to Europe. Cocaine, the pure substance that comes from a particular species of the coca leaf, has evolved from traditional usage in the indigenous community of the Andes to the highly illegal consumption in America. Plowman (1989) a taxonomist from the botany department

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