Exegesis Essay

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    the need of proper Hermeneutic skills for right application of the biblical Corpus. Indeed, the use of necessary tools has been encouraged for better application of the Scriptures. Towards the end of the essay, the author makes tentative conclusions. KEYWORDS: Bible, God, hermeneutics, exegesis, corpus, text, context, application, hope, warfare, Greco-Roman, kingdom, struggle, believer, victory Introduction The term “Hermeneutics” comes from a Greek word, that means “to interpret” hence it signifies

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    Midrash Exegesis

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    After many centuries of the advancement of pedagogy and institutionalize scientific standards, Biblical exegesis often stands as a rigorous, meticulous discipline. The necessity of studying Scripture within the framework of accepted Biblical criticisms, research methods, and orthodoxy of proper hermeneutics often makes studying the Bible a systematic science, instead of a spiritual discipline of divine revelation. However, within the Jewish tradition many Rabbis forsake these modern criteria

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    Biblical Hermeneutics Essay

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    This method stated that a text should be interpreted according to the rules of grammar and the facts of history. The exegetical principles of this school of thought laid the groundwork for modern exegesis. Augustine, who lived from A.D. 354 – 430, was a genius in certain aspects of biblical exegesis. He was part of the Western School of interpretation. He developed significant theories of biblical interpretation such as: the interpreter must possess a genuine Christian faith & the literal and

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    The writer of the book of Ecclesiastes is correct, “What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.” (Eccl 1:9). It is especially true in America. Racial and ethnic divisions appear to be just as wide as they were during era of slavery, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow. Within the past century, Christianity in America, particularly Evangelical Christianity has endeavored to address social issues like racism but unfortunately has been relatively

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    historical context in which they are written and the human fallibility of the authors. As with Liberals, traditionalists believe that some aspects of the Bible need to be reinterpreted for today. Traditionalists place a lot of emphasis on the process of exegesis. However, after establishing the intended meaning of the author the next step in the traditional approach is the question of how it should be applied to Christian today. However, whereas fundamentalists believe that the true meaning of a text should

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    called an exegesis. An exegesis is to hear the word of God as the people in the Bible heard the word of God to find out what was the original intent of the words of the Bible. (Stuart, 2003) Most Christians unknowingly do exegesis by explaining how people lived in the Bible days and why we do not do those same things today. Although anyone can do an exegesis it is recommended to seek the help of an expert when attempting to do a reputable exegesis if needed. Anytime Scripture is read an exegesis is the

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    Hermeneutics Percer

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    that the author’s interpretation was not stress, simply stated, the Scripture would be read and the preacher would use life experiences to support his premise. Stuart rebuttal this argument by stating, “The first task of the interpreter is called exegesis. This involves the careful, systematic study of the Scripture to discover the original, intended meaning.”4 In brief, Scripture is God’s Word, and he wants people to read it because of its great value to

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    Exegesis of James Essay

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    Exegesis of James I. Background The exegete of Holy Scripture in order to properly understand the full meaning of the passage must have a thorough knowledge of the background of the passage. It is important to know the author, intended readers and hearers, date, place of writing, occasion and purpose, and the literary genre of the passage. This paper will do all of these in a way that will give the reader a clear understanding of all that is necessary and important to know and understand

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    The following essay I will be conducting an exegesis of Genesis 3; 1-12 in its ancient and modern context. I will be analysing themes that run throughout the text and the importance of these themes in identifying the meaning of this passage. Genesis 3 revolves around the fall of creation, in this essay I will analysing the fall and the roles the characters play in the fall and evaluate the fall of humanity and the implications this has modern society. Serpent is repeated throughout the Bible for

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    Exegesis of the Gospel according to Matthew Chapter 5:3-12 The Eight Beatitudes In Matthew's Gospel, starting with Chapter five verses three through twelve, Jesus tells us of the Eight Beatitudes. These verses are much like The Ten Commandments in nature, but more philosophical: · "Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven." · "Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted." · "Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the Earth." · "Blessed are those

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