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    Lou Gehrig uses several rhetorical devices in his speech. These rhetorical devices include understatement, anaphora, epistrophe, book-ending, but he also uses rhetorical questions and appeals to pathos. On July 4th, 1939 at Yankee Stadium an audience of 60,000 people gathered to honor Lou Gehrig with a farewell ceremony. Lou Gehrig was diagnosed with ALS which forced him to retire so the players of the 1927 New York Yankees as well as the current team of 1939 showered Gehrig with gifts, though he

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    Lou Gehrig’s purpose for giving his speech was to remind his fans there is a bright side even when given a “bad break.” When Gehrig was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), not only were he and his loved ones devastated, but so were his innumerable supporters. This insidious disease had begun to steal Gehrig’s once intimidating power, and he and those close to him started to notice. Rumors abounded; Gehrig wanted to assure his fans he still considered himself blessed and lucky. Throughout

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    In Lou Gehrig’s, “Farewell to Baseball”, he is addressing not only his loved ones, his fans, but the American people who are witnessing his disease take it’s course. Although Gehrig was suffering from the terrible affects of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (later coined “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”), his speech sounds more comforting than it does fearful. Gehrig uses rhetorical devices such as the emotional appeal pathos in order to convey a positive connotation despite the “bad break” he is addressing.

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    Professional baseball player, Lou Gehrig, in his speech, "Farewell to Baseball Address," sheds light on his baseball career and why it was coming to an abrupt end. Gehrig's purpose was not to be distraught about him getting diagnosed with ALS, but instead send a message to not take anything for granted and be thankful for everything that happens. He adopts a thankful tone by showing how humble he is to have played the game of baseball with many great people thus using grateful terminology for

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    Seventy-three years ago, on July 4th, a man whose skillset lied on the baseball field, much rather than in speechmaking, delivered one of the most effective and inspiring speeches of all time. His name was Lou Gehrig, and in the matter of approximately two minutes, he managed to reflect not only his own thoughts of his disease and retirement from baseball, but also the thoughts and mindsets of his fans and the American people during the 1930s. Lou Gehrig’s farewell speech, famously including the

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    Farewell Speech SOAPSTone Analysis The speaker is Lou Gehrig. He was a baseball player that suffered from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. He gave his speech as part of his retirement. It was very optimistic. The Farewell Speech was given on July 4, 1939 at an appreciation day celebrated in his honor. He gave the speech was given in a baseball field. People were upset about his retirement because he was very well known. People also were feeling sorry for him but he was being very humble

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    huge variation is accurate because the baseball salaries can get to astronomical numbers. The average season from the sample studied was 82 runs scored, 19 homeruns, 83 runs batted in with a .310 batting average. All of which are fantastic numbers from a baseball perspective. The standard deviation was 18.05 which means that 68% of all data was within that 82 runs scored mark which is a very accurate statistic. Another noted fact about the data sample was that Major League Baseball has at-bat requirements

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    his mark in 1926 when he batted .313 with 47 doubles, 20 triples, and 16 home runs. But, he became famous in 1927 when put batted one of the greatest seasons or any batter in history, hitting .373, with 218 hits: 52 doubles, 18 triples, 47 home runs, a .765 slugging percentage, and 175 runs batted in. Even though he lived in the shadow of his more famous teammate, Babe Ruth, he was one of the highest run producers in baseball history.

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    Essay On Mike Trout

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    crazy stats. Some categories he is number 1 is he scored the most runs and walks. Mike Trout is the best player in the MLB. Mike trout has a better than .300 batting average. This is a main key to becoming a great baseball player. One thing good baseball players have is constancy; you need consistency to keep a better than .300 batting average. Mike Trout has a very similar batting average to the great Barry Bonds, Barry Bonds batted just under .300 and Mike Trout bats .306, Barry bonds is considered

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    The Kid. Junior. The silky smooth left-handed swing that you could watch all day. 630 home runs. Range. 10 Gold Gloves. 13 All Star appearances. Ken Griffey. George Kenneth Griffey Jr. was born on November 21, 1969 in Donora, Pennsylvania. Ken was a buttery smooth slugger, and a five-tool centerfielder who was one of the most iconic athletes of the 90’s. George was born to parents Ken Griffey Sr. and Alberta Griffey. Although Ken was born in Pennsylvania, he moved to Cincinnati, as his father

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