An Analysis Of Walt Disney's ' The Lucky Rabbit Shorts '

1793 WordsDec 11, 20158 Pages
While many were shocked at the blatant racism displayed in The Song of the South, it is not the first piece of Disney animation to feature controversial material. Walt Disney’s Oswald the Lucky Rabbit shorts had quite a bit of adult humor in it. In one short, Oswald gets chased by a bear into a cave where a fight takes place. Oswald comes out wearing a fur coat and the bear comes out wearing nothing but a bra and panties (Griffin, 2000). A closer look at Disney films may also indicate that Disney may have subtly used their films to speak out about political and religious issues. In certain films, there seems to be set values based off of Western Christian beliefs. The film Bambi is also thought to send a message about gun control and environmentalism (Pinsky, 2004). A previous animator who worked on the Snow White film admits that after long hours of drawing the same old pretty girl, many of the crew would get bored and draw pornographic images on Snow White. To give Walt some credit, however, he didn’t know about the dirty drawings his crew had made, and his employees suspected that if he had found out he would not have been amused. “His humor was quite different than that of the man of the street. You could never tell Walt a dirty joke. Word got around quickly to new employees not to try and ingratiate yourself with Walt by telling him an off-color story. He thought dirty jokes were terrible, and he was embarrassed by them” (Goldberg, 2014). Disney isn’t just

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