Essay about Baroque Period (1600-1750) General Background

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Baroque Period (1600-1750)
General Background
The years between 1600 and 1750 were full of contradiction, change, and conflict in Europe. The future would be shaped by the far reaching consequences of war. These conflicts pitted mainly the northern countries (Belgium, Germany, England, Sweden) against the Catholic kingdoms of the south (France, Spain, Austria), and further accentuated the pre-existing cultural differences between Northern and Southern Europe. However, tremendous scientific, philosophical, and artistic accomplishments that constitute the practical foundation of modern civilization flourished side by side with continual warfare, political instability, and religious fervor, bordering on fanaticism. Some of the most
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•Absolutism and Patronage: Absolutism in government and the patronage system created an environmentthat fostered enormous growth in the arts.
•The rise of the bourgeoisie: The new merchant class becomes a supporter of the arts, creating the climate for the development of a Baroque style in Northern Europe, particularly in Holland.
The essential, philosophical outlook of the period was characterized by:

•The emphasis on the individual, the personal character of religious experience, and the use of artistic expression to convey those experiences
•The rise of capitalism and mercantilism as tools of empire building and financial basis for the rise of the bourgeois class
•The creation of the baroque style—an art style full of emotion, flamboyancy, symbolism, vigor, and subtlety—largely as a product of the Catholic Church patronage of the arts

Aided by philosophy, mathematics, and newly developed instruments and experimental methods, Baroque astronomers, mathematicians, philosophers, and writers, fueled the scientific revolution of the 17th Century by proposing world views that challenged conventional assumptions and questioned established Church dogmas. The scientific advances of this period had a profound impact on all spheres of human activity including the arts and music.

The scientific revolution is traditionally considered to be framed between 1543—the year of On the revolutions of the heavenly spheres by Nicolaus