Corporate Behaviors in Indonesia

655 WordsJan 28, 20183 Pages
The eyes of the world will be on Indonesia as we approach the presidential elections in July and last week, President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono addressed the Forests Asia Summit in Jakarta in what will be one of his last speeches on this vital topic. Under his leadership, Indonesia has seen a sea change in its commitment to environmental issues and sustainability. The moratorium, announced in May 2011, on further deforestation — despite being less extensive than some would like — was a significant moment. Three years later, sustainability remains on the agenda for all of the prospective Presidential candidates. Another sign of the extent of this transformation is the marked change that has come about in some corporate behavior in Indonesia. It is no coincidence that during the same period European consumers have become increasingly conscious of the impact of their consumption habits on global deforestation. European companies such as Unilever, Nestle and Kingfisher have led the way in transforming their business models to respond to consumer demand for higher standards of environmental protection. In Europe, it is governments who are now playing catch-up, as new legislation such as the European Union Timber Regulation seeks to tackle illegal logging, but activists, citizens and politicians are calling for the regulations to go further and to ensure that all timber products entering the EU markets come from a sustainable source. In the last two years, we have seen
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