Dynamic Systems Development Method and Methodology

3630 WordsFeb 12, 201315 Pages
Normative Information Model-based Systems Analysis and Design (NIMSAD) MM A Structured System Analysis and Design Method (SSADM) and Dynamic System Development Method (DSDM) Comparison Normative Information Model-based Systems Analysis and Design (NIMSAD) MM A Structured System Analysis and Design Method (SSADM) and Dynamic System Development Method (DSDM) Comparison 08 Fall 08 Fall Table of Contents Introduction 1 Structured System Analysis and Design Method (SSADM) 3 Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM) 5 Normative Information Model-based Systems Analysis and Design (NIMSAD) 7 Methodology Context 8 Use Situation 8 Start of Methodology Use 9 Customers and Problem Owners 10 Context Description 10 Culture and Politics of…show more content…
Areas of consideration are the “hardware architectures, software to use, the cost of the implementation, the staffing required, the physical limitations, the distribution including any networks which that may require and the overall format of the human computer interface” (Wikipedia, 2012). From that, a technical system is chosen. Stage 5: Logical Design Here, the logical design is focused on the requirements for human computer interface. The end products are a “data catalog, required logical data structure and logical process model” (Wikipedia, 2012). Stage 6: Physical Design All logical requirements are converted to descriptions of system hardware and software (Wikipedia, 2012). “Logical data structure is converted into a physical architecture in terms of database structures” (Wikipedia, 2012). Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM) DSDM is an agile development method that is based on Rapid Application Development (RAD). It uses an iterative and incremental approach to system development. Its main goals are to accommodate changing requirements and meet business needs on time and in budget. DSDM implementation includes 9 essential principals: active user involvement, empowered users or teams, focus on frequent delivery, business fitness criterion for accepted deliverables, iterative and incremental development, reversible changes during development, requirements base lined at high level, integrated
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