The 's Hierarchy Of Needs Only Address Interpersonal Relationships And Desires On An Individual Basis

1721 Words Apr 11th, 2015 7 Pages
While frameworks such as Malsow’s Hierarchy of Needs only address interpersonal relationships and desires on an individual basis, McClelland determined that by establishing quantifiable imperatives one might be able to explain not only personal needs, but also the needs of a society. McClelland ranks societies based on their Nach or “need to achieve”, their Naff or “need of affiliation” and their Npow or “need for power”. Societies that have overall high Nach values are... These values allow social scientists to determine what factors specific to that culture might hint at why they are patterned in such a way. It could be factors ranging from geopolitics to climate to spirituality.
For China, although never outright addressed by McClelland’s study might have fallen under a high Naff value because of its history of population growth, paternalistic social structures and . But China might also score a high Npow value due to its tributary mentality and general mistrust of foreigners. Usually high Nach countries are those, curiously enough with ties to Protestantism. These countries with high levels of achievement are generally Northern European or highly influenced by European culture. Countries with higher Nach and Npow are generally boasting higher GDP than their Naff counter parts.
The Capitalist mantras of the hard work and competition are structural factors that define how to achieve success and national income growth. This is the capitalist call to arms, ‘try harder’.…

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