What is Human Resource Strategy Essays

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What is Human Resource Strategy HRS In your view is it a process an outcome or
“What is Human Resource Strategy (HRS)? In your view is it a process, an outcome or a set of activities?”

This essay will rely on a review of literature and may include:

A rationale for the: (i) emergence of HRS, (ii) the value of HRS, (iii) some discussion of differing approaches to HRS, (iv) some discussion of HRS strategy types (hard v soft), (v) the concept of fit and other issues which you wish to include based on your reading, (vi) including your conclusion, with your definition of HRS.


Introduction.

Schuler and Walker (1990) define Human Resource Strategy (HRS) as “a set of processes and activities jointly shared by human resources and line managers
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However managing people or ‘human resources’ is much more complicated than managing equipment for example, however does allow for much more scope and varying ideologies and techniques.

It is for these reasons that organisations are focusing on human resources as “Companies everywhere are changing the way they manage in order to be competitive” (Walker, 1993: p1). These firms need to find a new competitive advantage, and the implementation of a HRS that is beneficial and supportive in achieving the overall strategic plan is a means of doing so, or put differently, achieving a desirable outcome through a set of processes and activities.

In this new business culture of ‘strategic management’, fitting every ‘division’s’ strategy in to the overall strategy has become the norm. Human resource management has developed and ‘integrated’ its processes and activities in strategic management, ‘through the new discipline’ of strategic human resource management (Wright, McMahon, 1992: p49).
Associated to this point is Barney’s assertion that “Managers must look inside their firms for valuable rare resources and exploit these resources through their organization” (Barney, 1995: p61).

The emergence of HR strategies can therefore be explained by the development of corporate strategies that firms began to implement as a means…