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Miquel Vasquez was proud of his job as a new product manager for a biotechnology start-up, and he loved the high stakes and tough decisions that went along with the job. But as he sat in his living room after a long day, he was troubled, struggling over what had happened earlier that day and the information that he now possessed. Just before lunch, Miquel's boss had handed him a stack of private strategic documents from the company's closest competitor. The information was a CI gold mine— product plans, pricing strategies, partnership agreements, and other documents, most of them clearly marked proprietary and confidential." When Miquel asked where the documents came from, his boss told him with a touch of pride that he had taken them right off the competing firm's server. "I got into a private section of their intranet and downloaded everything that looked interesting," he said. Later, realizing that Miquel was suspicious, the boss would say only that he had obtained "electronic access" via a colleague and had not personally broken any passwords. Maybe not, Miquel thought to himself, but this situation wouldn't pass the 60 Minutes test. If word of this acquisition of a competitor's confidential data ever got out to the press, the company's reputation would be ruined. Miquel didn't feel good about using these materials. He spent the afternoon searching for answers to his dilemma, but found no clear company policies or regulations that offered any guidance. His sense of fair play told him that using the information was unethical, if not downright illegal. What bothered him even more was the knowledge that this kind of thing might happen again. Using this confidential information would certainly give him and his company a competitive advantage, but Miquel wasn't sure that he wanted to work for a firm that would stoop to such tactics. Confront your boss privately and let him know that you're uncomfortable with how the documents were obtained and what possession of them says about the company's culture. In addition to the question of the legality of using the information, point out that it is a public relations nightmare waiting to happen.

BuyFind

Management, Loose-Leaf Version

13th Edition
Richard L. Daft
Publisher: South-Western College Pub
ISBN: 9781305969308
BuyFind

Management, Loose-Leaf Version

13th Edition
Richard L. Daft
Publisher: South-Western College Pub
ISBN: 9781305969308

Solutions

Chapter
Section
Chapter 3, Problem 2ED
Textbook Problem

Miquel Vasquez was proud of his job as a new product manager for a biotechnology start-up, and he loved the high stakes and tough decisions that went along with the job. But as he sat in his living room after a long day, he was troubled, struggling over what had happened earlier that day and the information that he now possessed. Just before lunch, Miquel's boss had handed him a stack of private strategic documents from the company's closest competitor. The information was a CI gold mine—

product plans, pricing strategies, partnership agreements, and other documents, most of them clearly marked proprietary and confidential." When Miquel asked where the documents came from, his boss told him with a touch of pride that he had taken them right off the competing firm's server. "I got into a private section of their intranet and downloaded everything that looked interesting," he said. Later, realizing that Miquel was suspicious, the boss would say only that he had obtained "electronic access" via a colleague and had not personally broken any passwords. Maybe not, Miquel thought to himself, but this situation wouldn't pass the 60 Minutes test. If word of this acquisition of a competitor's confidential data ever got out to the press, the company's reputation would be ruined. Miquel didn't feel good about using these materials. He spent the afternoon searching for answers to his dilemma,

but found no clear company policies or regulations that offered any guidance. His sense of fair play told him that using the information was unethical, if not downright illegal. What bothered him even more was the knowledge that this kind of thing might happen again. Using this confidential information would certainly give him and his company a competitive advantage, but Miquel wasn't sure

that he wanted to work for a firm that would stoop to such tactics.

Confront your boss privately and let him know that you're uncomfortable with how the documents were obtained and what possession of them says about the company's culture. In addition to the question of the legality of using the information, point out that it is a public relations nightmare waiting to happen.

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Management, Loose-Leaf Version
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