Nathan Rosillo stared out his office window at the lazy curves and lush, green, flower-lined banks of the Dutch Valley River. 1 led grown up near here, and he envisioned the day that his children would enjoy the river as he had as a child. But now his own company might make that a risky proposition. Nathan is a key product developer at Chem-Tech Corporation, an industry leader. Despite its competitive position, Chem-Tech experienced several quarters of dismal financial performance. Nathan and his team developed a new lubricant product that the company sees as the turning point in its declining fortunes, lop executives are thrilled that they can produce the new product at a significant cost savings because of recent changes in environmental regulations. Regulatory agencies loosened requirements on reducing and recycling wastes, which means that Chem-Tech can now’ release waste directly into the Dutch Valley River. Nathan is as eager as anyone to see Chem-Tech survive this economic downturn, but he does not think this route is the way to do it. He expressed his opposition regarding the waste dumping to both the plant manager and his direct supervisor, Martin Feldman. Martin has always supported Nathan, but this rime was different. The plant manager, too, turned a deaf ear. “We’re meeting government standards, he’d said, “It’s up to them to protect the water. It’s up to us to make a profit and stay in business." Frustrated and confused, Nathan turned away from the window, his prime office view’ mocking his inability to protect the river he loved. I le knew that the manufacturing vice president was visiting the plant next week. Maybe if he talked with her, she would agree that the decision to dump waste materials in the river was ethically and socially irresponsible. Bur if she didn't, he Would be sharing on thin ice. His supervisor had already accused hint of not being a team player. Maybe he should just be a passive bystander after all, the company isn’t breaking any Laws. 3. Call the local environmental advocacy group and get the group to stage a protest of the company.

BuyFind

Management, Loose-Leaf Version

13th Edition
Richard L. Daft
Publisher: South-Western College Pub
ISBN: 9781305969308
BuyFind

Management, Loose-Leaf Version

13th Edition
Richard L. Daft
Publisher: South-Western College Pub
ISBN: 9781305969308

Solutions

Chapter
Section
Chapter 5, Problem 3ED
Textbook Problem

Nathan Rosillo stared out his office window at the lazy curves and lush, green, flower-lined banks of the Dutch Valley River. 1 led grown up near here, and he envisioned the day that his children would enjoy the river as he had as a child. But now his own company might make that a risky proposition.

Nathan is a key product developer at Chem-Tech Corporation, an industry leader. Despite its competitive position, Chem-Tech experienced several quarters of dismal financial performance. Nathan and his team developed a new lubricant product that the company sees as the turning point in its declining fortunes, lop executives are thrilled that they can produce the new product at a significant cost savings because of recent changes in environmental regulations. Regulatory agencies loosened requirements on reducing and recycling wastes, which means that Chem-Tech can now’ release waste directly into the Dutch Valley River.

Nathan is as eager as anyone to see Chem-Tech survive this economic downturn, but he does not think this route is the way to do it. He expressed his opposition regarding the waste dumping to both the plant manager and his direct supervisor, Martin Feldman. Martin has always supported Nathan, but this rime was different. The plant manager, too, turned a deaf ear. “We’re meeting government standards, he’d said, “It’s up to them to protect the water.

It’s up to us to make a profit and stay in business."

Frustrated and confused, Nathan turned away from the window, his prime office view’ mocking his inability to protect the river he loved. I le knew that the manufacturing vice president was visiting the plant next week. Maybe if he talked with her, she would agree that the decision to dump waste materials in the river was ethically and socially irresponsible. Bur if she didn't, he Would be sharing on thin ice. His supervisor had already accused hint of not being a team player. Maybe he should just be a passive bystander after all, the company isn’t breaking any Laws.

3. Call the local environmental advocacy group and get the group to stage a protest of the company.

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Chapter 5 Solutions

Management, Loose-Leaf Version

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