Military doctrines

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  • Military Doctrine Defines Logistics As The Science Of Planning And Carrying Out The Movement And Maintenance Of Forces

    1801 Words  | 8 Pages

    Military doctrine defines logistics as ‘the science of planning and carrying out the movement and maintenance of forces’.1 Logistics is the applied art of moving armies and providing for the provision of support to keep that army moving or in location. It is a continuous and never ending operation. For the purposes of this paper it may be taken that a focus on the art of sustainment — that is, the actual process of maintaining an army during operations, with a smaller focus on the administrative

  • Success of the Amphibious Military Doctrine

    728 Words  | 3 Pages

    How Successful is the Amphibious Military Doctrine? Amphibious Doctrine is the integration of both the Navy and land based military force such as the Air Force or Army (Spiller, 1992). The main component that makes this an operation is the cooperation between the forces to conduct a mission. It requires a speedy transfer of armed men, combat equipment, and attack strategy from sea to land with little or no advance knowledge of the enemy forces. The Navy including the Marines must be able to conduct

  • The Caliph Harun Al Rashid

    763 Words  | 4 Pages

    Aside from this general emphasis on the value of cleverness and intelligence however, the story of the Caliph Harun al-Rashid and his much-exalted qadi Abu Yusuf also highlights an interesting point about religion and the works to follow or otherwise remain within the confines of certain religious mandates while simultaneously being able to pursue whatever personal ends one desires. Though the qadi claims that the actions of the Caliph all fall within accordance with the Qur’an and the teachings

  • Essay on It's Time to Abolish Religion

    848 Words  | 4 Pages

    Can a society exist emancipated from religion? Will its foundations decay due to the absence of it, or will it flourish and achieve a new stratum of knowledge which will result in a peaceful co-existence? The word “religion” has its roots in the Latin word “religare” which means to bind together, or to connect; on the contrary I argue religion has been an apparatus of division, rather than achieving collectivism, thus doing much more harm than good. History represents the bloody warfare instigated

  • Manoeuvrist Approach, Mission Command And OODA Loopist Theory Analysis

    1134 Words  | 5 Pages

    on those questions it will be necessary firstly to explain basic theoretical points about Manoeuvrist Approach, Mission command and OODA loop cycle. Throughout history, military theorists and commanders have attempted to determine and define the most effective way to defeat an adversary and achieve victory. British military doctrine defines this method as the Manoeuvrist Approach or indirect approach, which main focus is basically on attacking enemy’s cohesion and will to fight rather than focusing

  • Manoeuvrist Approach

    1319 Words  | 6 Pages

    Throughout history, military theorists and commanders have attempted to determine and define the most effective way to defeat an adversary and achieve victory. British military doctrine defines this method as the Manoeuvrist Approach or indirect approach, which main focus is basically on attacking enemy’s cohesion and will to fight rather than focusing purely on the destruction of his physical component. The approach itself is based on manoeuvre theory, which relies on speed, deception, surprise

  • Air Superiority In The Military

    1729 Words  | 7 Pages

    Introduction (1/2) Air superiority is the single most important factor in deciding the outcome of a modern conventional war. Military operations on land, sea, or in the air are extremely difficult, if not impossible, for the side that doesn’t control the sky. In the words of Field Marshal Bernard L. Montgomery, “If we lose the war in the air, we lose the war and we lose it quickly.” (supremacy)[introduction] , Main Point 1: Identify and describe a deficiency in a Joint Force Capability, significant

  • Statement Essay: What Is The Bush Doctrine?

    1632 Words  | 7 Pages

    “What is The Bush Doctrine?” The Bush Doctrine is an ideology developed by think tanks of neo-liberal and neo-conservative political scientists in the United States much earlier than when President George W. Bush assumed power. Nevertheless, Bush was the first to openly declare it as the landmark of his foreign policy while the aftermath of the tragic events of 9/11 provided a fertile ground for its practical advancement. These events did not spark the ideas encompassing the doctrine; rather, they expedited

  • Analysis Of The Big Stick In The Caribbean Sea

    718 Words  | 3 Pages

    though it were a mere pool of water and dragging a fleet of steamships as if they were toys on a children’s playroom floor. He is depicted as a masculine, strong, and brave man as he holds a huge and seemingly hefty stick that represents the Monroe doctrine. Theodore Roosevelt confidently strides barefooted through the sea water and is wise to stow his boots to preserve their dryness for use in the future. While pulling his naval ships along, he seems to have been making rounds all through the Caribbean

  • Theodore Roosevelt 's Influence On Latin America

    1290 Words  | 6 Pages

    policies in Latin America were beneficial for the rapidly growing United States, but left an impact on Latin America that was both positive and negative. President Roosevelt took past policies of the United States, such as the unenforced Monroe Doctrine of 1823, and amended them to have the backing of the Navy in the early 1900s. One particular amendment was called the Platt Amendment of 1901, and opened the door to United States expansionism under President Roosevelt. It was under this amendment

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