Analysis Of Alan Murray 's ' The Wall Street Journal Guide '

2162 Words Nov 18th, 2016 9 Pages
In accordance with an adaptation from The Wall Street Journal Guide to Management by Alan Murray, published by Harper Business, although leadership and management must function collectively, they are not identical, however they are unavoidably connected and corresponding; any attempt to disconnect the two is liable to initiate more complications than it resolves. Nevertheless, considerable effort has been consumed outlining the dissimilarities. The manager’s responsibility is to strategize and coordinate, whereas the leader’s responsibility is to encourage and motivate. (Murray, A., 2009)

Part A:

Manager

A manager is an individual in an establishment who is accountable for the four operations of occupational management: preparation, coordinating, leadership, and commanding. You will observe that one of the tasks is leadership, therefore, you may presume that all managers are leaders. Hypothetically, yes, all managers would be leaders if they successfully accomplish their leadership accountabilities to communicate and encourage workforces towards an elevated level of production. Conversely, not all managers are leaders frankly, because not all managers are able to do all those elements just itemized. An underling will adhere to the guidelines of a manager for exactly how to achieve a duty because they must, however an operative will willingly adhere to the instructions of a leader because they have confidence in who they are as an individual, what they represent and…
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