Digestion of Starch by the Action of Salivary Amylase

1519 WordsJun 20, 20137 Pages
Austin Peay State University Department of Chemistry CHEM 1021 BREAKING DOWN STARCH USING SALIVARY AMYLASE Caution: You will be using a Bunsen burner and glassware to create your own constant water bath. Appropriate caution should be exercised when dealing with the Bunsen burner, hot water, and glassware. Purpose: Many plants store their energy in the form of starch, a polysaccharide made from repeating units of the monosaccharide glucose. Our bodies break down starch into the individual glucose units, which are further metabolized into CO2 and water through the process of glycolysis—this is the process we commonly call digestion. The enzyme amylase is present in our saliva and…show more content…
Pour this into a clean 50‐mL beaker to mix. In a 100‐mL graduated cylinder, put in 1 mL of saliva and 99 mL of water for the 1% solution. Pour this into a clean 150‐mL beaker to mix. 3. Set up 10 reaction tubes (label with a wax pencil) of varying saliva concentrations in a test tube rack as follows: Tube # Saliva Distilled water Final saliva % 1 3 mL 100% 0 mL 100% 2 2 mL 100% 1 mL 66.7% 3 1 mL 100% 2 mL 33.3% 4 3 mL 10% 0 mL 10% 5 2 mL 10% 1 mL 6.7% 6 1 mL 10% 2 mL 3.3% 7 3 mL 1% 0 mL 1% 8 2 mL 1% 1 mL 0.67% 9 1 mL 1% 2 mL 0.33 % 10 0 mL 3 mL 0% 4. Start the reactions: Add 3 mL of a 2% starch solution to the tubes. Mix, and then simultaneously add all 10 tubes to the water bath. After exactly 30 minutes, add 2 drops of the iodine solution to the tubes and record the resultant color. A blue solution means starch still remains, and a colorless solution means all starch has been broken down into glucose. Revision SP11 Page 2 of 7 Austin Peay State University Department of Chemistry CHEM 1021 BREAKING DOWN STARCH USING SALIVARY AMYLASE 5. Determine the amylase number: a. Find the most dilute solution of saliva that
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