Leadership Style and Their Effects on Ceos

812 Words Feb 8th, 2013 4 Pages
Leadership Styles and Their Effect on CEOs

Leadership Style and Their Effect on CEOs
LaKisha Feggins
November 21, 2012

Leadership Styles and Their Effect on CEOs

Abstract

The purpose of this essay is to analyze, compare, and contrast the leadership styles of two influential CEOs. I have collected information from many internet sources that elaborate on the life, achievements, and misfortunes of Jack Welch and Steve Jobs, and how they overcame their obstacles to become the best CEOs of all time.

Leadership Styles and Their Effect on CEOs

Leadership is a process by which a person influences others to accomplish an objective and directs the organization in a way that makes it more cohesive. Jack Welch and Steve Jobs
…show more content…
He managed to make GE the world’s second largest company with a market capitalization that was only exceeded by Microsoft. Through hard work and perseverance Welch managed to attain legendary status of being one of the greatest CEOs of all time.

Leadership Styles and Their Effect on CEOs

Steve Jobs was an entrepreneur, co-founder, chairman, and CEO of Apple Inc. As the CEO of the company, Jobs covered the development of the iMac, iPod, iPhone, and iPad, and on the services side the company’s Apple Retail Stores, iTunes store, and the App store. The success of these products under Jobs provided stable years of financial return, and propelled Apple to become the world’s most valuable publically traded company. The reinvigoration of the company is regarded by commentators as one of the greatest turnarounds in business history (Gallo, 2011).
Jobs was a “one-in-a-billion” innovator with a bulldog mentality. He created a vision and relentlessly drove it into completion. Jobs was a demanding perfectionist who always aspired to position his business and products at the forefront of the technology industry by understanding and setting trends with innovation and style. His reputation was built on being a brutal force and often destroyed staff for their “bozo” ideas and typically shrugged off his associates suggestions in favor of his own gut instinct. Moreover, he only wanted what he called “A-players”. Meaning that they had to be