menu
bartleby
search
close search
Hit Return to see all results
close solutoin list

I. Advertising To model sales of its tires, the manufacturer of GRIPPER tires used the quadratic equation S = a 0 + a 1 x + a 2 x 2 + b 1 y , where S is regional sales in millions of dollars, x is TV advertising expenditures in millions of dollars, and y is other promotional expenditures in millions of dollars. (See the Extended Application/Group Project “Marginal Return to Sales,” in Chapter 9.) Although this model represents the relationship between advertising and sales dollars for small changes in advertising expenditures, it is clear to the vice president of advertising that it does not apply to large expenditures for TV advertising on a national level. He knows from experience that increased expenditures for TV advertising result in more sales, but at a decreasing rate of return for the product. The vice president is aware that some advertising agencies model the relationship between advertising and sales by the function S = b 0 + b 1 ( 1 − e − a x ) + c 1 y where a > 0 , S is sales in millions of dollars, x is TV advertising expenditures in millions of dollars, and y is other promotional expenditures in millions of dollars.* The equation S n = 24.58 + 325.18 ( 1 − e − x / 14 ) + b 1 y has the form mentioned previously as being used by some advertising agencies. For TV advertising expenditures up to $20 million, this equation closely approximates S 1 = 30 + 20 x − 0.4 x 2 + b 1 y which, in the Extended Application/Group Project in Chapter 9, was used with fixed promotional expenses to describe advertising and sales in Region 1. To help the vice president decide whether this is a better model for large expenditures, answer the following questions. What is ∂ S 1 / ∂ x ? Does this indicate that sales might actually decline after some amount is spent on TV advertising? If so, what is this amount?

BuyFindarrow_forward

Mathematical Applications for the ...

11th Edition
Ronald J. Harshbarger + 1 other
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781305108042

Solutions

Chapter
Section
BuyFindarrow_forward

Mathematical Applications for the ...

11th Edition
Ronald J. Harshbarger + 1 other
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781305108042
Chapter 14, Problem 1EAGP1
Textbook Problem
1 views

I. Advertising

To model sales of its tires, the manufacturer of GRIPPER tires used the quadratic equation S = a 0 + a 1 x + a 2 x 2 + b 1 y , where S is regional sales in millions of dollars, x is TV advertising expenditures in millions of dollars, and y is other promotional expenditures in millions of dollars. (See the Extended Application/Group Project “Marginal Return to Sales,” in Chapter 9.)

Although this model represents the relationship between advertising and sales dollars for small changes in advertising expenditures, it is clear to the vice president of advertising that it does not apply to large expenditures for TV advertising on a national level. He knows from experience that increased expenditures for TV advertising result in more sales, but at a decreasing rate of return for the product.

The vice president is aware that some advertising agencies model the relationship between advertising and sales by the function

S = b 0 + b 1 ( 1 e a x ) + c 1 y

where a > 0 , S is sales in millions of dollars, x is TV advertising expenditures in millions of dollars, and y is other promotional expenditures in millions of dollars.* The equation

S n = 24.58 + 325.18 ( 1 e x / 14 ) + b 1 y

has the form mentioned previously as being used by some advertising agencies. For TV advertising expenditures up to $20 million, this equation closely approximates

S 1 = 30 + 20 x 0.4 x 2 + b 1 y

which, in the Extended Application/Group Project in Chapter 9, was used with fixed promotional expenses to describe advertising and sales in Region 1.

To help the vice president decide whether this is a better model for large expenditures, answer the following questions.

What is S 1 / x ? Does this indicate that sales might actually decline after some amount is spent on TV advertising? If so, what is this amount?

This textbook solution is under construction.

Still sussing out bartleby?

Check out a sample textbook solution.

See a sample solution

The Solution to Your Study Problems

Bartleby provides explanations to thousands of textbook problems written by our experts, many with advanced degrees!

Get Started